Short Story Friday: The Bluest Eye by Lance Larsen

As Tyler points out below, this is technically creative nonfiction. But it’s a story. And it’s short. And it’s by Lance Larsen. And its features the name La Vawn.

Title:

Author: Lance Larsen

Publication Info: Brevity 29, January 2009

Submitted by: Tyler Chadwick

Why?: “Though this isn’t technically a short story, it is a very short narrative that shows Larsen’s poetic acuity and that blurs the generic distinctions we like to make. It also speaks to some interesting things about sight and perspective, about how we view the world, and about the wonder of human relationships (as comes through the eyes [pun intended] of childhood).”

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5 thoughts on “Short Story Friday: The Bluest Eye by Lance Larsen”

  1. .

    I know this isn’t really a literary response, but I’m left wondering how that pink socket keeps itself clean…?

  2. I loved this essay . . . story . . . whatever. Reminded me of my first encounter with a false eye when I was, oh, eight or so. I was the child cleaning lady for a woman in our ward. Merrily dusting her bedroom dresser one day, I picked up the velvet “ring” box to look at her jewelry and found myself faced with her eye. It scared me so bad I dropped it and sent it rolling across the floor under the bed. After retrieving it, I put it carefully back in the box, then ran to the bathroom to wash my hands.

    Your version is much better, Lance, much more poetic and well . . . disturbing in some ways.
    Wonderful!!

  3. Zoe, you should write your story up, supplying the details and sensory images. It would be interesting to get together an anthology about eyes or fake eyes. “The Bluest Eye,” Flannery O’Connor’s “Good Country People,” and Edgar Allen Poe’s “The Telltale Heart” come to mind. What about others? If you want to include fake body parts or lost limbs, John Ormond’s “Lament for a Leg” (in Definition of a Waterfall) is a lovely piece.

  4. I took from Lance Larsen at BYU. Amazing teacher. Amazing writer. Also loved the devotional address he gave on creativity… one of the best I’ve ever heard (devotionals, and treatises on creativity.)

  5. Best line/phrase (in my opinion): “scanning my mother’s kitchen for a more responsible owner.”

    Nice, and amusing. I also give Larson full credit for stopping, rather than seeing some need to sustain it at greater length.

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