About the author: William Morris

Obligatory switch to third person:

William Morris lives in Oakland, CA, with his wife and daughter. He is a Web editor, Elder’s Quorum instructor*, casual carpool rider, fair weather Giants fan and champion binky wrangler. He considers himself a “gentleman scholar,” which means that he’s too proud of his degrees in English lit and comparative lit to label himself an amateur and too lazy and unfocused to pursue a career in academia. He became enthralled with the idea of Mormon literature when he discovered two and half shelves of Mormon fiction and poetry in the library of the Berkeley LDS Institute and became the first person in decades to check out such titles as Clinton F. Larson’s “The Mantle of the Prophet” and Cracroft and Lambert’s groundbreaking Mormon literature anthology “A Believing People.” He promises to return the work that inspired the title of this blog as soon as he finishes that one essay he’s trying to write.

*After an eight year run (including three different wards), my luck ran out (or rather, I was granted an opportunity to dedicate more of time to the Lord). I’m now a member of the EQ presidency. And I’m still working on that essay. The first draft is finally finished.

4 thoughts on “About the author: William Morris”

  1. william, saw your comment elsewhere, staggered back to your blog in a daze, and just wanted to tell you that i am also a fan of ‘Movement’.

    when i was 14 and doing some vinyl shopping with a friend in Danville, he pulls out of a stack of new arrivals a 12″ bearing no writing, minimal artwork, and no indication of who even made the album. it was $10, and he proceeded up to the counter to buy it. i was confused. “do you even know who made the album?” “sure,” he said “it’s a new order record.” “how do you know?” “i just know.” he paid for it, ripped off the plastic and slid the record out of its sleeve. sure enough, the latest new order 12″

    end of happy little story.

    christian in brentwood

  2. I much appreciated your earlier comments on THE NEPHIAD and wondered if you had anything further to say about the poem. Thanks for mentioning it; I’ve had several requests for information/copies that named your pages as source.

    Would you be interested in seeing something else? What I consider a brief epic (emphasis on BRIEF, at least compared to the first) composed of individual modified sonnets. TALIESIN deals with two mythic figures: Arthur and Joseph Smith, coming to grips with the history of the latter by using the imagery associated with the former. I’ve read the sequence at the BYU SF/F symposium, with positive results. If you would like to see the sequence, I will send it on to you.

    Best,
    Michael Collings 

    Posted by Michael Collings

  3. W:

    This is not a comment but a favour to ask.

    I am looking for a copy of the text for the Romanian Hymn “Si Eu Voi Da.” I googled it and found your comment posted on another blog, so I know you have it.

    I want to sing it at Sac Mtg this sunday (2 days), but I havent a copy of the Rom. Hymnal with me. Can you help?

    Make sure you write me back so we can catch up from the last 12 years. You are the ONLY comp from whom Ive had ZERO contact since I left the field…you cipher.

    Posted by Dan Merkley

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